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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 50  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 427-433

Decalcified allograft in repair of lytic lesions of bone: A study to evolve bone bank in developing countries


Department of Orthopaedics, Ganesh Shankar Vidyarthi Memorial Medical College, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Anil Kumar Gupta
Department of Orthopaedics, P-6, Medical College, Kanpur - 208 002, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5413.185609

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Background: The quest for ideal bone graft substitutes still haunts orthopedic researchers. The impetus for this search of newer bone substitutes is provided by mismatch between the demand and supply of autogenous bone grafts. Bone banking facilities such as deep frozen and freeze-dried allografts are not so widely available in most of the developing countries. To overcome the problem, we have used partially decalcified, ethanol preserved, and domestic refrigerator stored allografts which are economical and needs simple technology for procurement, preparation, and preservation. The aim of the study was to assess the radiological and functional outcome of the partially decalcified allograft (by weak hydrochloric acid) in patients of benign lytic lesions of bone. Through this study, we have also tried to evolve, establish, and disseminate the concept of the bone bank. Materials and Methods: 42 cases of lytic lesions of bone who were treated by decalcified (by weak hydrochloric acid), ethanol preserved, allografts were included in this prospective study. The allograft was obtained from freshly amputated limbs or excised femoral heads during hip arthroplasties under strict aseptic conditions. The causes of lytic lesions were unicameral bone cyst ( n = 3), aneurysmal bone cyst ( n = 3), giant cell tumor ( n = 9), fibrous dysplasia ( n = 12), chondromyxoid fibroma, chondroma, nonossifying fibroma ( n = 1 each), tubercular osteomyelitis ( n = 7), and chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis ( n = 5). The cavity of the lesion was thoroughly curetted and compactly filled with matchstick sized allografts. Results: Quantitative assessment based on the criteria of Sethi et al. (1993) was done. There was complete assimilation in 27 cases, partial healing in 12 cases, and failure in 3 cases. Functional assessment was also done according to which there were 29 excellent results, 6 good, and 7 cases of failure (infection, recurrence, and nonunion of pathological fracture). We observed that after biological incorporation, the graft participates in bone physiology and morphology. We did not observe any adverse host graft antigenic reaction. Conclusions: We conclude that decalcified allograft is suitable alloimplant for use in benign lesions of bone, is easy to prepare and store, and is thus well suited for use in developing countries.


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