Neurobionplus
Home About Journal AHEAD OF PRINT Current Issue Back Issues Instructions Submission Search Subscribe Blog    
Login 

Users Online: 1564 
Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 48  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 404-409

Outcome in primary cemented total knee arthroplasty with or without drain A prospective comparative study


1 Department of Reconstructive Surgery and Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint, Medical University of Lodz, 91-002 Lodz, 75 Drewnowska, Poland
2 Department of Reconstructive Surgery and Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint, Medical University of Lodz, 91-002 Lodz, 75 Drewnowska, Poland; Department of Orthopedics, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, SE-971 80 Lulea, Sweden

Correspondence Address:
Rafal Keska
Department of Reconstructive Surgery and Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint, Medical University of Lodz, 91 002 Lodz, Drewnowska 75, Poland

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5413.136285

Rights and Permissions

Background: Suction drain insertion is a common practice in orthopedic surgery, especially after joint arthroplasty to prevent the formation of a hematoma. Theoretically the use of a drain should diminish the volume of hematoma; however the literature has conflicting data. Some authors state that drainage evacuates fluid from a limited area only and can be a cause of infection due to retrograde migration of bacteria. It can also impair the early postoperative rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome (especially postoperative pain) and intake of analgesics in patients who had undergone primary cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with or without a postoperative drain. Materials and Methods: A prospective comparative study of 108 consecutive patients (121 knees) was conducted. They were divided into two groups: A study group, with no drainage and a control group with drain inserted at the end of surgery. A total of 121 patients were recruited into two groups. A study group consisted of 59 knees, in which we did not use drainage after TKA and a control group with 62 knees, in which drain was inserted post surgery. Both groups were comparable in terms of preoperative characteristics. The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis (n = 105) and rheumatoid arthritis (n = 16). Results: In patients without drainage we observed lower need for opioids, higher blood loss on the 1 st postoperative day and a lower need for change of dressings. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of total blood loss, hidden blood loss, transfusion rate, range of motion, length of hospital stay or incidence of complications between the two groups. In 1 year observation there were no differences in clinical outcome between the two groups. Conclusions: The present study conclude that there is no rationale for the use of drain after primary TKA. There are benefits in terms of lower opioid intake, lower blood loss on the first postoperative day and lower need for dressing reinforcement during hospitalization.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1929    
    Printed36    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded150    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 4    

Recommend this journal