Neurobionplus
Home About Journal AHEAD OF PRINT Current Issue Back Issues Instructions Submission Search Subscribe Blog    
Login 

Users Online: 472 
Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 108-115

The basic science of peri-implant bone healing


1 Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto,Toronto, ON, Canada
2 Division of Orthopedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto; Division of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Paul RT Kuzyk
Apt. 602, 120 Lombard St. Toronto, ON, M5C 3H5
Canada
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5413.77129

Rights and Permissions

Given the popularity of cementless orthopedic implants, it is imperative for orthopedic surgeons to have a basic understanding of the process of peri-implant bone healing. Contact and distance osteogenesis have been used to explain peri-implant bone healing. In contact osteogenesis, de novo bone forms on the implant surface, while in distance osteogenesis, the bone grows from the old bone surface toward the implant surface in an appositional manner. Contact osteogenesis may lead to bone bonding if the surface of the implant displays the appropriate surface topography. The early stage of peri-implant bone healing is very important and involves the body's initial response to a foreign material: protein adsorption, platelet activation, coagulation, and inflammation. This results in the formation of a stable fibrin clot that is a depot for growth factors and allows for osteoconduction. Osteoconduction is the migration and differentiation of osteogenic cells, such as pericytes, into osteoblasts. Osteoconduction allows for contact osteogenesis to occur at the implant surface. The late stage of healing involves the remodeling of this woven bone. In many respects, this process is similar to the bone healing occurring at a fracture site.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6077    
    Printed296    
    Emailed4    
    PDF Downloaded272    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 18    

Recommend this journal