Neurobionplus
Home About Journal AHEAD OF PRINT Current Issue Back Issues Instructions Submission Search Subscribe Blog    
Login 

Users Online: 513 
Print this page  Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size 
SYMPOSIUM - GIANT CELL TUMOR
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 41  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 109-114

Giant cell tumor of bone: Is curettage the answer?


Department of Orthopaedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110029, India

Correspondence Address:
Shishir Rastogi
Department of Orthopaedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5413.32040

Rights and Permissions

Background: Giant cell tumors (GCT) are neoplasms of mesenchymal stromal cells with varied manifestations. There is no uniform accepted treatment protocol for these tumors, Materials and Methods: 49 cases of proven giant cell tumors of appendicular skeleton, 27 prospective and 22 retrospective constituteed this study. The retrospective cases were collected by using computerized data base collection method. The patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and by histology. Companacci grading and Enneking staging was used in the study. Two treatment modalities were used a) extended curettage (with/ without bone grafting/ cementation) or b) wide excision and reconstruction with a prosthesis or arthrodesis. Functional evaluation was done by Enneking's system. Chi square tests, mann- whitney test and ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. Results: The average age was 26.82 years (16-50 years). 25 patients (51%) were recurrent GCT at presentation. The commonest site was lower end of femur (16 cases, 32.65%) and upper end of tibia (13 cases, 26.53%). 40 (81.63%) tumors had less than 5 mm of subchondral bone free of tumor. 35 (71.43%) tumors were Enneking's surgical stage III and companacci grade III. Pathological fractures were seen in 12 (24.49%) cases. Intra-lesional currettage was used in 28 and enbloc excision in 19 patients and 2 (4.08%) underwent amputation. The average follow up period was 18.6 months (range 2-84). One recurrence was seen in a grade III recurrent distal radial lesion in the intralesional curettage group (3.57%) Enneking's functional score with intralesional curettage (25.41) was better than enbloc excision (21.37). Enbloc excision had higher rates of infections (36.84 % Vs 25%) and soft tissue coverage problems (21.05% Vs 0). Conclusion: Intralesional therapy has a better functional outcome and less complications than enbloc excision, albeit with a high recurrence rate which can however be effectively treated with repeat extended curettage.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed5695    
    Printed221    
    Emailed2    
    PDF Downloaded427    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 10    

Recommend this journal