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TRAUMATOLOGY
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 29-34

Titanium elastic nailing in pediatric femoral diaphyseal fractures


1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Physical Medicine, Paraplegia, and Rehabilitation, Pt. BD Sharma, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Rohtak, India
2 Professor of Orthopaedics, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Dehradun, India

Correspondence Address:
Roop Singh
8J/3, Medical Enclave Rohtak-124001 (Haryana)
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5413.34071

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Background: The need for operative fixation of pediatric femoral fractures is increasingly being recognised in the present decade. The conventional traction and casting method for management of pediatric femoral fractures is giving way for the operative stabilisation of the fracture. Methods : Thirty five pediatric patients in age group 6-14 years with diaphyseal femoral fractures were stabilised with two titanium nails. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for two years. The final results were evaluated using the criteria of Flynn et al. Technical problems and complications associated with the procedure were also analysed. Results : Overall results observed were excellent in 25, satisfactory in 8 and poor in 2 patients. Hospital time averaged 12.30 days in the series. All the fractures healed with an average time to union of 9.6 (6-14.4) weeks. Return to school was early with an average of 7.8 weeks. The soft tissue discomfort near the knee produced by the nails ends was the most common problem encountered. Shortening was observed in three cases and restriction of knee flexion in 5 patients. There was no delayed union, infection or refractures. Per operative technical problems included failure of closed reduction in 2 cases and cork screwing of nails in one case. Conclusion : We believe that with proper operative technique and aftercare TENs may prove to be an ideal implant for pediatric femoral fracture fixation. The most of the complication associated with the procedure are infact features of inexact technique and can be eliminated by strictly adhering to the basic principles and technical aspects.


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